Corrected: Olympus OM-D E-M1 (and E-M5II) Back Button Focus

Some reader’s questions enlightened me to the fact that I didn’t have all of the necessary information in this post, so I’ve tried to rectify that.  Sure hope it helps.  🙂

“Back Button Focus” refers to a way to engage autofocus (AF) on your camera separately from the shutter button, and is the preferred technique for many photographers.  The big benefit (for me) is that it allows me to stay in Manual Focus (MF) while retaining the capability to AF if I want to.  In practice, it allows you to use AF and then automatically revert back to MF so you can refine if necessary.  Then, you can expose, compose, and shoot without worrying about the focus changing when you take the shot.  Plus, it enables you to tweak the focus if necessary.  It’s also handy in the studio, so you can focus on your subject and then not worry about possibly changing the focus point every time you press the shutter button.

The beauty of the way I set up my E-M1, is that with just a flick of the Lever, I can easily get back to full AF with the shutter button.  So here’s one way to do it … there are probably others.  Go into the Custom Setup (Gear icon) – Menu B (Button/Dial/Lever) – Lever Function and set it to Mode 5.  The first 4 modes essentially change which dial or button is used to change WB and ISO.  I prefer to do that in either the SCP (Super Control Panel) or set my Right and Down Arrow Keys for those functions.

There are also two other settings required for this to work.  First, you must keep the AEL/AFL Button configured to AEL/AFL:  Custom Menu B – Button Function – AEL/AFL Function – AEL/AFL.  Second, go to Custom Menu A – AEL/AFL, press the OK Button, select MF and press OK again.  Now, set MF to mode 3 and press OK one more time.  If you also like using Back Button Focus when in S-AF, then set S-AF to mode 3, also.  BUT, if you set S-AF to mode 3, you lose the AEL functionality of the AEL/AFL button when the lever is in position 1.

Continue reading “Corrected: Olympus OM-D E-M1 (and E-M5II) Back Button Focus”

Advertisements

E-Book for the Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II

There’s a brand new e-book already out, all about the Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II.  Professional photographers Gary L. Friedman and Tony Phillips have collaborated to quickly release this new book, and it’s another good one!  You’ll find it provides the shortest learning curve for this infinitely configurable camera.

The book is very well written in the usual easy-reading style you find in all of the camera books from The Friedman Archives.  In its 430 pages, there is great coverage of virtually every button and function on the camera, with lots of photos, examples, tips, and tables.  Speaking of tips, here are a couple of good ones straight from the book:

I’ve read several camera books by both of these guys and always appreciate the thoroughness and depth they provide.  I highly recommend this book for new (and experienced) E-M5II shooters.  Plus, with the money-back guarantee, you really don’t have much to lose.  So head over to The Friedman Archives for all of the details.

And don’t forget to look around while you’re there.  Gary has many outstanding images, and there are books about virtually all of the recent major cameras from Olympus, Sony, and Fujifilm.

Fuji X-T1 Firmware Update Guide Now Available!

Tony Phillips, the guy who’s written two great books about Fuji cameras already, the X100S and X-T1, has released a guide to the latest X-T1 Firmware Update version 3.0.  Like his other books, this one is well researched, beautifully written, and full of insights into the update.

The update has at least 27 new / improved features for the X-T1 and some of Tony’s favorites include:  additional customization of the reprogrammable Q-Menu, more Function button items, high-speed electronic and hybrid shutter, a new Chrome film simulation, and manual focus tweaking in autofocus.  In this free update, you’ll find great information about all of these and more.

To get your Free copy, you’ll need to send an email request to Tony Phillips (click his name to send the email).  Or, if you haven’t bought his X-T1 book yet, go to The Friedman Archives to purchase the primary book and get the Firmware update included.

BTW, Tony is currently working on his next book … about the Fuji X100T, so stay tuned for that release.

Supplements About the Sony A7S and A7II Are Now Available

Picture Profiles … S-Log 2 … Timecode … What does it all mean?

The newer Sony A7S and A7II are using terms that many of us “regular” photographers know nothing about.  At least I didn’t until I read Gary Friedman’s just released supplement to the A7S.  The bulk of this supplement is all about the video features that most non-videographers aren’t very familiar with.

Each supplement is a little over 70 pages, covering just what’s new and different from the original A7/A7R.  They’re available as downloadable ebooks from Gary’s website Here:
http://www.friedmanarchives.com/A7r/index.htm

The cost is a very reasonable $6.95 each, but it’s information that would be very difficult (if not impossible) to find anywhere else.

E-M1 Firmware Version 2.0 eBook Now Available – Free!

I just finished a comprehensive guide to Firmware Update Version 2.0 for the Olympus OM-D E-M1.  It’s now available for FREE download at The Friedman Archives.  If you’d like to get it, please send an email request to Gary Friedman.

The eBook is available as a .pdf file, .mobi (for Kindle), or .epub for other e-readers.  So you should be able to read it on just about any device that you may own … whether it be a tablet, phone, or computer.

Don’t forget to check out the other camera and photography books available at:
www.FriedmanArchives.com

Last Minute Opportunity to Attend Photography Seminar – Oct. 18-19

There are still some openings for one of Gary Friedman’s widely acclaimed High-impact Photography Seminars.  I realize this is very short notice since the two-day seminar begins tomorrow at 10:00 AM in Los Angeles, but here is your chance to learn the secrets to taking “Wow!”-type images and what is really important in photography.

Gary’s well known website, The Friedman Archives, is a great place to view his amazing images from all over the world, pick up a great ebook about your camera, or sign up for one of his seminars.

You can find out all of the information about the seminar and sign up for it here:

The full two-day seminar is only $125 and will be held in Los Angeles:
Acme Theatre (Yes, that’s the real name)
135 N. La Brea Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90036

E-M1 Firmware 2.0 Brings Live Composite Feature

The Olympus OM-D E-M10 came with a feature found on no other OM-D camera (or possibly any other camera), and that feature was called Live Composite.  It’s a way of “sort of” doing time lapse photography, but with each successive image added to all the previous images, much like using the Lighten Blending mode to merge layers in Photoshop.  Now, FW 2.0 brings this great function to the E-M1.

With this first image, I used Live Composite with the overall exposure set to underexpose by a couple of stops.  Then, I just slowly added soft light to the parts I wanted to brighten, all the while watching the image develop in real time on the LCD.

To use Live Composite (LC), you have to go to Manual and pass through all of the slow shutter speeds, past Live Time and Bulb.  Once you’re in LC, you’ll be able to adjust your shutter speed by pressing the Menu Button to access that menu.  However, before you go to LC, I suggest doing some test shots in manual to determine your base or starting exposure.  Once this is set and you begin the LC exposure, the dark areas won’t increase in brightness, only parts of the image that are brighter will be added, and only up to the set exposure.  I know this is a little confusing, but as soon as you use it once or twice, it will become very clear.  One other tip … you should use a tripod for this.

In the above photo, the image on the left shows the result after 22 exposures (46 seconds), while the right one shows after 49 exposures. The only increase in brightness is from light painting that I did with a flashlight. This also shows the display you will see on your camera, showing total elapsed time, your set shutter speed and number of exposures, plus a histogram to help you judge the correct (desired) exposure.

Live Composite should be a great tool for capturing star trails or car light trails. Or, how about getting that smooth look on flowing water or fast moving clouds. I think it’s perfect for light painting, too, but just use your imagination to come up with lots of new applications and then be sure and share your ideas with the rest of us.

This is a very brief introduction, but I go into more detail in an ebook I’ve written, a comprehensive guide to Firmware Update Version 2.0 for the Olympus OM-D E-M1.  It’s now available for FREE download at The Friedman Archives.  If you’d like to get it, please send an email request to Gary Friedman.